TEACHING LAB SKILLS FOR
SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING

Who We Are

Our volunteers teach basic software skills to researchers in science, engineering, and medicine. Founded in 1998, we are now part of the Mozilla Science Lab.

What We Do

We run bootcamps all over the world, and provide open access material for self-paced instruction. We also run a training program for people who'd like to help us teach.

How To Help

Like all volunteer organizations, we depend on you to help us help others. You can host a bootcamp, help create new teaching materials, or improve the tools we use.

Do Not Be Worried

By Greg Wilson / 2014-04-16

Sage advice for our instructors and learners from an eight-year-old:

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Summarizing Our Instructors' Skills

By Greg Wilson / 2014-04-15

We've been asking bootcamp participants to tell us about themselves for a while now, so it seems only fair to share some information about our instructors. First, of the 82 instructors who responded to our survey two weeks ago, how many are comfortable teaching which topic to novices, to intermediates, or not at all?

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Bridging the Writing Gap

By Greg Wilson / 2014-04-06

A few months ago, we had an interesting discussion about what Software Carpentry should teach about writing and publishing in the 21st Century. One thing that came through loud and clear was the gulf between people who value the "I can see what I'm doing" of Microsoft Word and those who care more about the "I can tell what I did" of version control1.

Sites like Authorea, writeLaTeX, and ShareLaTeX are trying to bridge that gulf by giving people a WYSIWYG authoring tool in the browser that uses LaTeX as a storage format. This is pretty exciting: since it (potentially) allows collaborators to interact in whichever mode they prefer, it allows people to transition from one to the other instead of requiring them to make a great leap sideways.

Both sites currently allow people to save work on site or in Dropbox. It would be very cool if they also allowed people to save work in online version control repositories such as GitHub. Someone who isn't comfortable with version control could simply select "Save..." to push their changes, while someone who's already mastered pull requests and merging could interact that way, so that once again, the system could help people transition gradually from one mode to the other.

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Does Continuous Publication Require Continuous Attention?

By Greg Wilson / 2014-04-05

I read this post by Martin Fenner a couple of weeks ago. His thesis is that scientific publication is still very much a manual process, which makes publications relatively infrequent (and fairly painful) events. Instead, we ought to strive for continuous delivery: production of the "paper" (including release of associated code and data) should be fully automated so that authors can ship whenever they want with relatively little effort.

Continuous delivery is popular among software developers, who frequently argue it's more efficient using diagrams like this:

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Summary of March 2014 Meeting to Discuss Novice R Material

By John Blischak / 2014-04-04

Last week we had our first meeting to discuss the development of the novice R material. Our goal was to determine our plan for collaboratively creating the lessons.

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Blog Archives ⇒


Mozilla Science Lab logo

Software Carpentry is a project of the Mozilla Science Lab

Upcoming Bootcamps

Norway University of Bergen
April 23-24, 2014
Canada Instructor Training
April 28-30, 2014
United-States George Washington University
Apr 29-30, 2014
United-States Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Hershey Building, west conference room
May 12-13, 2014
Australia Monash University
Jun 02-04, 2014
Italy Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics
Jun 04-06, 2014
United-States Stony Brook University
Jul 08-09, 2014
United-States Vanderbilt University
Aug 12-13, 2014
...see all

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